cities and global warming and climate change

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Donald Klemen December 1, 2018 at 1:27 pm

Glad we have people researching, but no solutions presented.
Home builder are required to have runoff ponds.
If its farm runoff, it’s a lot more water than can be hzndled.
1 Farms must move away from rivers leading to ocean
2 Increase runoff ponds to catch rainwater
The water usually drains quickly in this area.
3 canal for extreme rains goes to Everglades distributed like it was before the large cities formed
4 If copper sulfate really helped, it could be added to the river water if the problem is observed.
5 change EPA rules on home fertilizers to ensure the quickly decompose. Same with weed control .
6 could pump to a reservoir for power gen.
The best breakdown is usually the sun. Spreading the water out when it goes to Everglades may help.
I don’t know how much any of these would help, and it sounds like it has been around a long time, but a real list of controls which may reduce it should be proposed by top biologist working with army corps.

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Don January 5, 2019 at 1:27 pm

How about ship fertilizer to ind, ky inland farms. It sounds like farm runoff needs to be diluted. Mixing clean runoff water from streets, roads with farm runnoff? Pump it to a temp reservoir to provide breakdown time? Inject current sulfate into streams during high periods of detected microbes? Redirect flow to everglades periodically to keep toxic levels low?
Do something. We can simulate weather, our universities can help.

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